Domains of Our Own Ontario Extend

Key Links for Extenders

East Cohort, Extender Blogs, Open Cohort, West Cohort

The Complexity of Digital Literacy

This blog post is in response to the Ontario Extend Activity “What is your definition of digital literacies for teaching?” in the Technologist module.  Before doing a little research, I would have said that I know what digital literacy is. It is the ability to locate, use, share, assess, and produce content using technologies and/or the internet. I didn’t realize that digital literacy is so incredibly complex! I don’t think there really is a correct definition of digital literacy but this […]

more...

Extender Blogs, West Cohort

Needless procedures: knee arthroscopy is one of the most common but least effective surgeries

Needless procedures: knee arthroscopy is one of the most common but least effective surgeries Knee arthroscopy requires admission to hospital and an anaesthetic. It carries some risk of harm such as infection or further damage in the joint. from shutterstock.com Ian Harris, UNSW; Denise O'Connor, Monash University, and Rachelle Buchbinder From time to time, we hear or read about medical procedures that can be ineffective and needlessly drive up the nation’s health-care costs. This occasional series will explore such procedures […]

more...

East Cohort, eCampus Ontario, Extender Blogs, West Cohort

At The Trail Head

This one doesn’t count as one of my nine posts. I’m just warming up for the Ontario Extend 9 X 9 X 25 Reflective Writing Challenge. I’m just at the trail head, getting my hiking boots on, stretching, and wondering where the trail will go. I also want to see what 25 sentences looks like. I want to see if I’ll need to write like this to get there. Maybe. Maybe not. This post could be a good opportunity for […]

more...

East Cohort, Extender Blogs, Open Cohort, West Cohort

To Cornell or Not?

This is a post in response to the Extend Activity ‘Try watching a TED talk or conference keynote video yourself to practice your own note-taking skills using Cornell Notes’ found in the Teacher for Learning module under the heading Organize Knowledge. I love watching TedTalks! I probably spent over an hour trying to narrow down which one I was going to watch for this activity, however I kept putting off doing this activity because I really am not a fan […]

more...

East Cohort, Extender Blogs, Open Cohort, West Cohort

Reflections on the 7 ‘How Learning Works’ Principles

This post is in response to the section ‘How Learning Works’ in the Teacher for Learning module on Ontario Extend. I will start off by saying that I really want to read this book, so my reflection on the seven principles will be based on just the topics — I will update this post after I read the book in full! Students’ prior knowledge can help or hinder learning When I first started teaching I underestimated how much prior knowledge […]

more...

Extender Blogs, North Cohort, West Cohort

@Nearpod for educators in the @Cambrianhub

Level-Up-Button Today I am exploring Nearpod in a little more depth than I have before in preparation for our Showcase today at 2:30. Last week I dug into it to see what it can do and found out that they have a Nearpod Teacher Resouces page with some tutorials, as well as pre-built lessons to play with. However, as I should have expected I am more of a play with the tool learner. Hey Laura. I use it in my classes all the time. […]

more...

Extender Blogs, West Cohort

Massage Therapy for Athletes

Growing up I was involved with hockey, soccer and distance running, so I had my fair share of injuries, most of these were minor muscle strains. Whenever I was injured I was interested in the rehabilitation process and how I could speed up my recovery and return to play quickly. This got me interested in the concept of performance support for athletes.The goal of performance support is ensuring that athletes possess the health, physical and mental capacities necessary to compete […]

more...

Extender Blogs, West Cohort

Does the brain really feel no pain?

Does the brain really feel no pain? Happy cake Happy cafe/Shutterstock.com Janet Bultitude, University of Bath The brain has no nociceptors – the nerves that detect damage or threat of damage to our body and signal this to the spinal cord and brain. This has led to the belief that the brain feels no pain. A belief that has entered popular culture. In the 2001 movie Hannibal, there is a gut-twisting scene in which the eponymous Hannibal Lecter cuts out […]

more...

Extender Blogs, West Cohort

WordPress Permalink: Domain Camp Week 6

I am wandering back to the camp fire to check out the last two weeks of Domain Camp. I had originally set my permalink to be just the name of the post but I thought I would try adding the year and the month as well. My concern is that I already have a really long URL with the subdomain of largecoffeefourcreams and my domain of procaffination.ca. So adding the dates may be too much. I don’t know what the […]

more...

Extender Blogs, West Cohort

Evidence-based Practice For Massage Therapists: Part 1

Evidence-based Practice For Massage Therapists: Part 1Massage Therapy has exploded into mainstream healthcare, it is now a recognized treatment option for a wide range of injuries. This means the profession is moving into new formal settings. As part of this shift, it is important that therapists learn to think critically and evaluate research. In an effort to bridge the gap between research and clinical practice, I have compiled a number of resources setting groundwork for evidence-based practice 1. Establishing A […]

more...