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Galswocl

Extend mOOC, Extender Blogs, mOOC Cohort

TESS2019 and Experimenter Badge

I attended both days of TESS2019 earlier this week. On the first day, I presented on an experiment from my most recent delivery of COMM1085: two uses of a checklist in Brightspace/D2L/eConestoga that were designed to incorporate more UDL into the course. On the second day, I participated in a workshop to explore the Experimenter mindset using H5P. I was electrified… (boo! literal image…) Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com I used the platform provided to apply for my Experimenter badge […]

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My Metaphor

For the culminating activity of the Teacher for Learning module, we are to identify our metaphor for teaching and learning. Photo by Tomasz Filipek on Pexels.com Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime. Source Contested. When I provide feedback, I try to deliver it as a question or as a recommendation, so that I can elicit what the learner’s (or the SME’s) goal […]

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Instructors as Regurgitators?

For the penultimate activity in the Teacher for Learning module in Ontario Extend, we’ve been asked to reflect on a passage from the Faculty Patchbook. Photo by Julius Silver on Pexels.com I read most of the patches, but I found myself drawn back to Patch Twenty-Two: Dibaabiiginan– Measure It and the desire to push students past regurgitation to find their own context. Paragraph 8 resonated especially: He relayed to me that by transferring his words to paper and pen, I […]

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Grammatically Yours

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com If I were to teach a course primarily on grammar again, I would ask everyone as we are learning about the parts of speech which part of speech they are like. Are they verbs? Transitive or intransitive? Are they adjectives that describe something else? Maybe they are a conjunction and good at joining things together. Or an interjection with all the emotion.

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Online Courses and Winter Driving

Photo by Magda Ehlers on Pexels.com Winter driving is a different beast than driving in the summer, and some people feel very uncomfortable behind the wheel of the car. You need more time to stop and be more careful when you take turns. But as the days and weeks pass and you remember again how winter driving is different, it gets easier. Creating an online course seems similar, especially for people who are new to it. When you’ve been teaching […]

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What would you want to study that for?

This post answers the question in the fourth activity in the Ontario Extend mOOC in the Teacher for Learning module: What’s in it for me? Embed from Getty Images My grandma asked me all the time: “What do you want to study Latin for? I had to study Latin in high school and I hated it!” I’m not teaching Latin now, but here are some of the reasons I used to share with students (and my grandma!) about why studying […]

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Taking Notes, Digesting Information

This reflection is based on the third Extend mOOC activity in the Teacher for Learning module: Cornell Notes. Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com I’ve always relied on taking notes by hand to process what I needed to read for school. I’ve never changed my style over {redacted} years, so I was pretty excited to try this technique that I had heard a lot about. I chose one of my favourite TED talks: Comma story by Terisa Folaron. This is a […]

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Concept Map of Syllabus

For my second Extend mOOC activity, I’ve created a concept map of part of the syllabus for the course that I’m teaching online right now: College Reading and Writing Skills. Since the goal is to organize knowledge and convey it in different modes, I chose to look at it from the point of view of the student. It makes sense as an instructor to use backward design: to identify learning outcomes, then to design assessments, and finally to plan learning […]

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Understanding Word Order

Word order is more flexible in Latin. For students who are used to English, this can be confusing and leads to misunderstanding what a Latin sentence means. It’s like cooking versus baking. English is like baking. Baking needs to follow proportions and ingredients more closely. Just like there’s a difference between baking powder and baking soda, there’s a difference between: Dog bites man. Man bites dog. Latin is more like cooking. It’s possible to switch some ingredients in the recipe […]

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